OSTEOPATHY

 

 

OsteoActive is a fusion between Osteopathic treatment and Clinical Pilates.

About Osteopathy

Osteopathy is a form of manual healthcare, which recognises the important, link between the structure of the body and the way it functions. Osteopaths focus on how the skeleton, joints, muscles, nerves, circulation, connective tissue and internal organs function as a holistic unit.
Using skilled evaluation, diagnosis and a wide range of hands-on techniques, osteopaths can identify important types of dysfunction in your body. Osteopathic treatment uses techniques such as stretching and massage for general treatment of the soft tissues (muscles, tendons and ligaments) along with mobilisation of specific joints and soft tissues.
In Australia, osteopaths are government registered practitioners who complete a minimum of five years' university training in anatomy, physiology, pathology, general medical diagnosis and osteopathic techniques.
Osteopaths are primary healthcare practitioners and are trained to recognise conditions that require medical referral. They are also trained to perform standard medical examinations of the musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, respiratory and nervous systems.
Osteopathy is covered by most private health funds and by Medicare's Chronic Disease Management (CDM) Plans. Osteopaths are registered providers for DVA patients, as well as by workers’ compensation schemes and motor accident insurers.

Treatment

Each injury is unique so osteopathic treatment will vary from person to person.
Osteopaths assess the mobility of problem areas, ask you questions and make a diagnosis to work out the best treatment plan for each patient.
Osteopaths treat more than you think. They focus on how your skeleton, joints, muscles, nerves, circulatory system, connective tissue and internal organs function as a whole body unit.
Find out how osteopathy can help you.

Head

The most common type of headache originates from tension, muscle stiffness or joint strain in the neck and upper thoracic region*.
Other causes include:

  • eye strain
  • sinus congestion
  • whiplash injury
  • stress
  • poor posture
  • jaw imbalance and teeth grinding
  • infection
  • allergies and food intolerances.

Depending on you presentation an osteopath may**:

  • work on your general mobility
  • improve the mobility of your ribs and thoracic and cervical spine
  • investigate muscular tension, nerve compression and inflammation
  • advise on posture, exercise and stretching to help prevent a recurrence of symptoms
  • offer guidance on diet and preventing dehydration
  • advise on improving the ergonomics of your home or workplace.

Osteopaths, as primary health care practitioners, are trained to differentiate between headaches with common causes and those due to serious pathology. You should always seek advice from a health professional, including an osteopath, if you get a headache after a head trauma and/or the headache is getting worse.

You should also seek professional advice if the headache is accompanied by:

  • fever 
  • nausea or vomiting
  • bleeding or fluid draining from the nose or ears
  • dizziness
  • blurred vision or speech
  • numbness, tingling or paralysis.

Did you know?

  • headaches are one of the most common medical complaints. A headache is rarely caused by serious underlying disease.
  • your osteopath may be able to assist with treatments that reduce the need for headache medications.
  • your osteopath is a primary health care practitioner with the training and skills to assess your complaint and develop the most effective course of action (including referral when clinically indicated).
  • your osteopath can assess structural changes that may lead to immobility, pain and dysfunction. Your osteopath will perform a thorough physical examination, including observation and palpation, to form a diagnosis and treatment plan.

If you get regular headaches, try keeping a headache diary

If you experience headaches regularly, keeping a headache diary can help identify these triggers and ultimately help them avoid them. A headache diary allows you to record important details about your headaches, such as symptoms, frequency and other. This diary will provide your osteopath with important information.

Back and Neck Pain

80% of the population will suffer from back pain at some time.
Studies show that osteopathic treatment reduces back pain, increases mobility and speeds the recovery process*.
Your osteopath can assist you to develop the course of action consistent with your lifestyle, symptoms and goals to manage your back and neck pain. 

Your osteopath may:

  • work on joint mobility
  • work on muscular tension, inflammation and nerve irritation
  • investigate blood supply and drainage to and from the spine and pelvis
  • reduce the duration of low back pain and help prevent future episodes
  • offer advice on posture, exercises and stretching
  • provide advice on improving your ergonomic environment
  • provide guidance on diet, hydration and exercise
  • communicate and plan treatmnet with your GP
  • refer you for radiological assessment when required
  • provide care funded by workers compensation schemes and traffic accident schemes. 

Osteopaths can be visited without a referral from a GP and are trained to know the difference between uncomplicated back pain and back pain requiring referral to specialist care. In some cases there may be a more serious cause for low back pain such as disc injury, fracture, tumour and infection, which requires ongoing specialist support.

Common causes of back and neck pain:

  • extensive sitting or standing
  • heavy lifting
  • injury
  • changes during pregnancy
  • constipation, irritable bowel
  • endometriosis
  • menstrual pain
  • insufficient flexibility
  • muscle weakness
  • dysfunction in the thorax, lower limbs and pelvis.

Pelvic Pain

Pelvic pain can be caused by a wide variety of conditions. Osteopaths can help with pain caused by trauma or repetitive strain. Muscles from the abdomen and lower limbs attach to the pelvis and overuse or over exertion of these regions can result in pelvic injury and pain.
Your osteopath will work with you to determine the cause of your pain and decide on a course of treatment.


Common pelvic injuries include:

  • Osteiitis Pubis – inflammation of the pubic bone
  • Sacroiliac joint pain and inflammation
  • Pelvic instability with pregnancy
  • Inguinal hernia

Symptoms of pelvic pain may include:

  • localised pain and tenderness on the pubic bone
  • pain on abdominal contraction e.g coughing, turning in bed, bearing down or when going to the toilet
  • groin pain
  • pain in the buttocks and down the back of the leg.

Osteopaths may help your pelvic pain by:

  • improving muscular flexibility in the region
  • improving joint range of motion in the low back, hips and pelvis
  • maintaining correct alignment of the lower back and pelvis 
  • providing advice on maintaining flexibility and strength around the pelvis.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sciatica

Sciatica is a painful syndrome caused by compression or irritation of the sciatic nerve. The sciatic nerve runs deep through the buttock and down the leg. Sciatica can range from a dull ache to an incapacitating pain. Symptoms may be constant or intermittent, depending on activities or time of day.

Osteopathy can be useful in relieving the symptoms of sciatica

Osteopaths will usually conduct a full musculoskeletal and orthopaedic examination to find the true underlying cause of the sciatica. Osteopaths treat the related joints, muscles, ligaments or tendons to reduce the pressure on the sciatic nerve.

Sciatica can often resolve quickly with the appropriate management and self-care.

Symptoms of sciatica may include the following:

  • pain in the buttock or down the leg
  • numbness
  • muscular weakness
  • pins and needles or tingling
  • difficulty moving or controlling the leg.

The pain associated with sciatica can be caused by a number of underlying conditions. These may include:

  • herniated (bulging) disc in the lower back
  • bony growths on the spine
  • arthritis in the low back or hip
  • tight muscles in the buttock or trauma to the lower back
  • pregnancy, due to changes in the pelvis and lower back.

Hip and Groin

Hip pain can be caused by a number of injuries or conditions. The most common cause of hip pain is inflamed tendons. Hip and groin pain can be related to a range of muscle or joint problems or it could be referred pain from your lower back.
Your osteopath will analyse your lower back and lower limb movement to help determine the cause of your pain. Because the hip is the centre of movement between the upper and lower parts of the body, it can easily be affected by poor movement control, posture or exercise.
Hip joint pain is often caused by a sitting position, landing awkwardly, certain sports, a sedentary lifestyle or arthritis. Hip joints can become sore when are held in a fixed position for a long time, or repeatedly moved into an uncomfortable position.

Minor and short term pain

Muscle pain often occurs in people who perform repeated sideways movements such as soccer players, dancers and AFL players. Many minor conditions can be painful but usually heal within a few days.
For muscular pain, your osteopath will look at the other muscles around your hip and groin to understand the cause of your discomfort.

Long term pain

Longer-term pain may be caused arthritis or bursitis. If pain is caused by arthritis your osteopath can help but may also suggest you see a GP for any additional medications or treatment.
Your osteopath will work with you to improve your posture, discuss the way you move or why you may be experiencing hip problems. 

Shoulder Pain

Shoulder pain has become extremely common over recent years as a result of frequent computer and smartphone usage and increased sedentary lifestyle.
Shoulder pain is often very complex. As a result, shoulder injuries can be more difficult to treat.

Your osteopath will work with you to determine the cause of your pain and decide on a course of treatment

Common Shoulder injuries include:

  • rotator cuff tears
  • tendonitis
  • shoulder impingement (Subacromial bursitis) – when shoulder tendons are trapped and compressed during shoulder movements
  • frozen shoulder (Adhesive Capsulitis) – when the shoulder capsule swells and stiffens, restricting mobility
  • postural tension
  • referred pain

Symptoms of shoulder pain may include:

  • 'catching' sensation when raising the arm or reaching
  • sharp pain when moving your arm
  • weakness in your arm or grip
  • throbbing and aching in shoulder whilst sleeping
  • pain radiating down the arm
  • neck and shoulder stiffness

Osteopaths may help your shoulder pain by*:

  • improving muscular flexibility in the shoulder area        
  • improving range of joint motion in the mid back, neck, shoulder blade and shoulder
  • addressing postural strains and bad habits
  • providing advice on maintaining flexibility and strength around the shoulder region
  • providing exercises for stretching and rehabilitation

Your osteopath may also refer you to a GP for any additional medications or treatment.

Elbow Pain

Elbow pain often occurs due to a variety of sports and occupations that involve repeated pressure on the muscles and tendons near the elbow joint. This pressure can cause the muscles to become strained and tendons to become inflamed. You will often notice the pain when using your wrist or hand. Your osteopath will work with you to determine the cause of your pain and decide on a course of treatment.

Common elbow injuries include:

  • tennis elbow
  • golfers elbow
  • radial head ligament sprains
  • ulnar nerve entrapment.

Symptoms of elbow pain:

  • weak grip
  • pain when twisting the wrist
  • constant dull ache, worse at night
  • sharp pain when moving the elbow joint.

Osteopaths may help your elbow pain by:

  • treating the area with manual therapy
  • providing advice on wearing brace support
  • applying sports taping
  • providing information and advice on taking anti-inflammatories
  • referring you to a GP for further investigation if needed.

 

" Empowering women, dancers and athletes on their physical and nutritional journey."